Little Rock VA Medical Center Police Officer Who Was Convicted of Armored Car Robberry Loses Appeal-Three Ex-Police Officers Lose Armored Car Robbery Appeal | KUAR

VA Police Officer Who Was Convicted of Armored Car Robberry Loses Appeal-Three Ex-Police Officers Lose Armored Car Robbery Appeal | KUAR

Three Ex-Police Officers Lose Armored Car Robbery Appeal | KUAR.

Three former police officers and another man have lost their federal appeal over their convictions for a 2007 North Little Rock armored car robbery.

The 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Tuesday upheld the convictions of Allen Clark, Jason Gilbert, Antonio Person and Sterling Platt.

Gilbert appealed his 3 1/2-year prison sentence, which the court also upheld.

Person, who is Gilbert’s cousin, was sentenced to 12 years in prison for leading the robbery, in which more than $400,000 was stolen.

The defendants claimed on appeal that the government didn’t have sufficient evidence to prove a conspiracy. The appeals court disagreed.

Gilbert was a Little Rock police officer, Clark was a Veterans Affairs officer and Platt was an officer at University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences.

Two VA officials retire, three reprimanded in wake of malpractice at Atlanta VA | www.ajc.com

 

VA Director says firings not necessary despite controversey

VA Director says firings not necessary despite controversey

Atlanta VA where two officials retire and three resign in wake of Senate investigation into malpractice!

Atlanta VA where two officials retire and three resign in wake of Senate investigation into malpractice!

Two VA officials retire, three reprimanded | www.ajc.com.

Two U.S. Veterans Affairs officials have retired, three have been reprimanded and others are facing unspecified “actions” following reports of rampant mismanagement and patient deaths at the Atlanta VA Medical Center in Decatur, a top VA official said Wednesday.

“A number of people have had both corrective and administrative action taken,” Robert Petzel, undersecretary for health for the VA, said at a congressional hearing in Atlanta.

“Two people involved in this process have resigned – retired from the VA. There are number of actions, which are still in the process.”

Petzel did not identify the VA officials involved and said he could not offer more specifics. But he said he has shared additional details with the Senate Veterans’ Affairs Committee.

U.S. Sen. Johnny Isakson led Wednesday’s hearing at Georgia State University in downtown Atlanta. The panel also heard testimony from the VA Office of Inspector General and was expected to hear from the Georgia National Guard, a veteran with the Wounded Warrior Project and community mental healthcare officials.

Isakson called for the hearing after federal inspectors issued scathing audits about the Atlanta VA Medical Center in April. The audits linked pervasive mismanagement to the deaths of three veterans at the 405-bed hospital.

OOPS…VA misdiagnoses veteran with ALS for 2 1/2 years! New finding restores hope for vet misdiagnosed with Lou Gehrig’s disease | Ocala.com

OOPS..VA misdiagnoses veteran with ALS for 2 1/2 years!

via New finding restores hope for vet misdiagnosed with Lou Gehrig’s disease | Ocala.com.

Vietnam War veteran John Williams feared he would be a casualty of war 43 years after he left the service, which included harrowing times in Vietnam.

Williams, 67, was diagnosed with diabetes in 1985 and later experienced progressive difficulty with movement and muscular control, which he said was misdiagnosed as ALS (also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease).

“I had made funeral arrangements and began to get my affairs in order after a Veterans Affairs doctor diagnosed me in October 2010 as having Lou Gehrig’s disease,” Williams said.

But, after learning about the Veterans Administration’s War Related Illness and Injury Study Center, Williams received a different diagnosis and, more importantly, a sense of hope.

Williams, who lives in southwest Ocala with Marti, his wife of 42 years, learned about the center, which has hospitals in East Orange, N.J.; Palo Alto, Calif.; and Washington, D.C.; in the VA’s quarterly publication, “Agent Orange Review.”

The publication is focused on possible victims of Agent Orange who have illnesses such as diabetes or Parkinson’s disease and may qualify for VA disability due to exposure to the potent herbicide.

Williams, a native of Waycross, Ga., moved to Starke in 1954. He enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1969, at age 23. He served on reconnaissance missions with the 4th Infantry Division 717th Recon in Vietnam for a year, beginning in July 1969.

“We were often stationed at forward bases and were subject to rocket attacks,” Williams said.

He said his experiences in war left him with post-traumatic stress disorder and that many of his health issues are from exposure to Agent Orange.

“We were often stationed at forward bases and were subject to rocket attacks,” Williams said.

He said his experiences in war left him with post-traumatic stress disorder and that many of his health issues are from exposure to Agent Orange.

“I was most recently working as a pharmaceutical representative and had problems with falling. When we had a presentation, I couldn’t stand up to applaud the speakers,” he said.

Williams’ local VA doctor referred him to the War Related Illness and Injury Study Center. In May, he traveled to Washington, D.C., for an intense battery of tests over four days.

The center’s physician team diagnosed Williams’ ailment as inclusion body myositis, which the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke of the National Institutes of Health calls a “progressive muscle inflammation accompanied by muscle weakness,” which may bring on “falling and tripping” and additional problems in daily activities.

Williams said the revised diagnosis has given him a new outlook on life.

Williams said he told the group at the center that it was a remarkable irony that a man who was a young soldier serving in Vietnam 45 years ago would be treated in 2013 by a team led by a young Vietnamese doctor during a “lifesaving visit” to their facility.

Williams’ brother, Ben Williams, accompanied him to the hospital and stayed at the nearby Fisher House facility.

“John went from having no hope to having hope. The diagnosis of Lou Gehrig’s disease had been like a death sentence for him,” Ben Williams, a 72-year-old Air Force veteran, said in a telephone interview from his home near Savannah, Ga. “The WRSCII medical team gave my brother a message of hope.”

Fort Wayne’s VA Hospital responds to Dept. of Veterans Affairs inspection report

Fort Wayne’s VA Hospital responds to Dept. of Veterans Affairs inspection report.

ort Wayne’s VA Hospital responds to Dept. of Veterans Affairs inspection report

Updated: Monday, 05 Aug 2013, 6:35 PM EDT
Published : Monday, 05 Aug 2013, 3:42 PM EDT

FORT WAYNE, Ind. (WANE) – The Chief of Staff at the VA Northern Indiana Healthcare System has reviewed the Department of Veterans Affairs inspection of its hospital and it agrees with the findings.

“This was no surprise that at any point for us, meaning we’re identifying these issues and working on these issues,” said Dr. Ajay Dhawan, Fort Wayne’s VA Hospital Chief of Staff.

The Office of Inspector General was called on by Senator Joe Donnelly and Congressman Marlin Stutzman to look into why the hospital suspended inpatient care late last year. Both Donnelly and Stutzman were surprised by the findings and found it “upsetting and inexcusable.”

The inspection found a few critical issues that need to be fixed right away. Some of those issues includes the facility did not effectively and consistently fill upper and mid-level leadership positions. It also found that managers who were in place often did not provide necessary leadership. It also looked at the quality of care given to patients, which was found to be under par.

Dr. Dhawan tells NewsChannel 15 that this report on validates the issues hospital administrators were aware of before the suspension of inpatient care last year. He said administrators have been working to fix these issues since last year, including looking at the level of service it provides in the intensive care unit.

“The answers we might come up with might vary from going to a tri-four level three ICU, to a level four ICU, to no ICU,” said Dr. Dhawan.

Another issue administrators are hammering away at is finding qualified individuals to fill management roles and provide necessary training to their first line staff such as nurses. Dr. Dhawan has been working to fill those positions.

“We’ve had success in finding two additional cardiologists since that time,” he said. “We have hired additional  hospitalists; we’ve found some mid-level managers like chief of primary car, chief of medicine that are now on board.”

In the report, it said the hospital might not be able to provide reliable services to the veterans. Dr. Dhawan said despite the findings, the hospital is more than capable to provide quality care and services to veterans who need it.

Legionnaires’ still puzzles Pittsburgh Veterans Affairs officials – Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Legionnaires’ still puzzles Pittsburgh Veterans Affairs officials – Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

Bob Muder still couldn’t believe what he was hearing.

On Oct. 31, the day after the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention told Robert Muder, chief of infection prevention at the Veterans Affairs Pittsburgh Healthcare System, that genetic testing confirmed that two patients contracted Legionnaires’ disease during stays at the VA, he wrote to two top Pittsburgh VA officials to express his doubts.

“I remain skeptical that the patients actually acquired infection here, but the results don’t exclude that,” Dr. Muder wrote to Ali Sonel, the chief of staff, and Mona Melhem, associate chief of staff at the Pittsburgh VA.

The next day, as the concept sank in that the Pittsburgh VA — once one of the world’s leading research centers for Legionnaires’ — was in the midst of a serious outbreak of the disease, he reached out to a top VA official in Washington, D.C.

“I really don’t know what’s going on here because we historically don’t see cases until there is a much higher level of contamination,” Dr. Muder wrote in an email to Richard Martinello, chief consultant of the clinical public health group at the central VA office.

That view of resistance and confusion in the Pittsburgh VA as it came to accept that it was in the midst of a deadly outbreak is contained in a trove of 3,200 pages of emails, memos, reports and other documents recently provided to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette by the VA in response to a Freedom of Information Act request.

The documents provide a unique look inside the Pittsburgh VA in 2011 and 2012 when as many as six veterans would die and another 16 would get sick from Legionnaires’.

They show the chaos and tension that grew inside the Pittsburgh VA as the public became aware of the outbreak in November 2012 and everyone, it seemed — from politicians, to media, to union officials, company salesmen and concerned citizens — called with concerns.

Perhaps most importantly, the emails and other documents demonstrate how the increasing and persistent problems with the copper-silver ionization system, designed to control the Legionella bacteria in the VA’s water system, were met by confusion and bewilderment by VA officials.

In November 2011, it was confirmed that Greg Jenkins, 53, — who would die less than a year later — had contracted Legionnaires’ while a patient at the Pittsburgh VA.

His was the only such case the VA conceded was hospital-acquired until the CDC stepped in a year later. But even then infection-prevention officials weren’t sure what to do about it.

“It is next to impossible to determine exactly where he acquired the Legionella within the facility during the six weeks he has been there,” the Infection Prevention Team minutes from Nov. 17, 2011, conclude about Mr. Jenkins’ case.

Seven months later, on July 26, 2012, an infection prevention team report says that, despite various problems maintaining the level of copper and silver ion levels in the VA’s water and difficulty in adjusting the copper-silver system: “At this point [Facilities Management Service] does not feel levels are a problem.”

The CDC’s report later found that 11 veterans had probably or definitely contracted Legionnaires’ at the Pittsburgh VA since February 2011, and three of them had died of the disease.

Ultimately, the documents show that no one within or outside the VA is ever able to answer why it was that the copper-silver system that had worked so well for so long had begun to fail to control the Legionella, not just in 2011, but as early as 2007, when the first hospital-acquired cases of Legionnaires’ in a decade began to appear at the Pittsburgh VA.

As the potential Legionnaires’ cases mount — and Dr. Muder and his staff dismiss all but one of them as hospital-acquired — Pittsburgh VA staff throw out a hodgepodge of possible reasons that the copper-silver system is not working properly, all of them eventually discounted.

Dr. Melhem, who was the VA official most responsible for closing the Legionnaires’ research laboratory in 2006 and firing and forcing out two top experts on the disease, Victor Yu and Janet Stout, embraced the CDC’s view that the copper-silver system just didn’t work anymore.

“Also, you have to know that the system is ineffective, and other hospitals dismantled it to go back to the good old chlorination, that works,” Dr. Melhem wrote in an email on Nov. 29, 2012, to laboratory supervisor Kevin Frank, after he complained to her about an article in which U.S. Sen. Bob Casey, D-Pa., said the outbreak was preventable.

Emails reveal that the chlorination system that Dr. Melhem said she liked so much will have to be replaced with chlorine dioxide because it is less corrosive than heavy doses of chlorine alone.

Internal VA politics occasionally rear their head in the emails as more cases begin to appear.

At one point in October and November 2011, Dr. Muder is seen in emails trying to find someone to do the genetic testing of some patient and environmental Legionella samples. But he is having a hard time tracking someone down.

Finally, in an email on Nov. 1, 2011, after trying at least two other experts, William Pasculle, director of UPMC’s clinical microbiology laboratories, tells him he can’t do it, either, but he advises Dr. Muder: “No. But Janet Stout can.”

Dr. Muder wrote Dr. Pasculle back: “I would love to have Janet do it but that’s not possible due to her association with a certain person, the administration would go ballistic when they saw the invoice.”

The certain person is Dr. Yu, the former longtime Pittsburgh VA researcher who got in a heated dispute with VA management in 2006 and was fired. He and Dr. Stout, who oversaw maintenance of the copper-silver system at the VA for three decades, run a private lab together in Pittsburgh. They are still considered international experts on Legionnaires’, but the VA would never allow Dr. Muder to hire them to help.

The U.S. House Veterans Affairs Committee will hold a public hearing Sept. 9 in Pittsburgh to examine the VA’s nationwide efforts to stop preventable deaths and medical errors.

Part of the hearing, set for 9 a.m. at the Allegheny County Courthouse, will focus on the 2011 and 2012 Legionnaires’ outbreak at the Pittsburgh VA and events in VAs in Atlanta, Buffalo, Dallas and Jackson, Miss.



Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/stories/local/neighborhoods-city/legionnaires-still-puzzles-pittsburgh-veterans-affairs-officials-698275/#ixzz2bDLnOd00

House Veterans Committee is Coming to Pittsburgh to Examine Preventable Deaths, Accountability at VA. Look out Mr. Moreland!

 House Veterans Committee is Coming to Pittsburgh to Examine Preventable Deaths, Accountability at VA! Look out Mr. Moreland,

Micheal Moreland VISN 4 Director doesn't need to worry about getting Legionnaires' disease from the Pittsburgh VA, because his office is off campus at the luxurious Del Monte center! More on VAmalpractice.info

While the water at the Del Monte Center maybe to Mr. Moreland’s liking, chances are the reception that he is going to get from the HVAC, when it comes to Pittsburgh won’t be. Look for an all out publicity offensive as VAPHS continues to try to amaze us with TV ads that contain lots of meaningless numbers and even more fuzzy math.

 

HVAC to Examine Preventable Deaths, Accountability at VA | House Committee on Veterans’ Affairs.

Wait until you see the new VISN 4 publicc service announcement "Not just first class. luxury class"

In a city that has two VA campuses the VISN 4 staff has chosen to locate its offices in the most expensive building in Pittsburgh. Visn 4 could locate anywhere, in the four states that it covers, including some really nice inexpensive suburban office space, that would have cost the taxpayers a fraction of what the DelMonte Center does.
While I can’t see either Pittsburgh VA medical facility from my office, I’ve got great vies of both of the stadiums. Being located off campus makes it more difficult for veterans to interact with my staff and I, which allows us plenty of time to take advantage of the numerous fine dining opportunities that are nearby.

WASHINGTON, D.C.— On Monday, Sept. 9, 2013, at 9:00 a.m. ET at the Allegheny County Courthouse in Pittsburgh, the House Committee on Veterans’ Affairs will hold a field hearing to examine the Department of Veterans Affairs’ approach to stopping preventable patient deaths and lapses in care at VA medical centers around the country.

 

The Veterans Health Administration provides health care services for some eight million American veterans, but a rash of preventable suicides, veteran deaths and infectious disease outbreaks at several VHA facilities throughout the country has put the organization under intense scrutiny. Despite the fact that multiple VA Inspector General reports have linked a number of veteran deaths to widespread mismanagement at VHA facilities, the department has consistently given executives who presided over these events glowing performance reviews and cash bonuses of up to $63,000.

 

The purpose of this hearing is to examine whether VA has the proper management and accountability structures in place to stop the emerging pattern of preventable veteran deaths and serious patient-safety issues at VA medical centers across the country. In doing so, the committee will specifically look at VA’s handling of recent events in Atlanta, Pittsburgh, Dallas, Buffalo, N.Y., and Jackson, Miss.

 

The following event is open to the press:

 

WHO:             House Committee on Veterans’ Affairs

 

WHAT:          Hearing: A Matter of Life and Death: Is VA Doing All It Can To Stop Veterans from Dying?

 

WHEN:          9:00 a.m. ET, Monday, Sept. 9, 2013

 

WHERE:       Allegheny County Courthouse, 436 Grant St., Pittsburgh, PA 15219

 

Witnesses and logistical info will be announced at a later date.

Fort Wayne Ind VA Hospital Releases Report On Temporary “Pause” (VIDEO) | Indiana’s NewsCenter: News, Sports, Weather, Fort Wayne WPTA-TV, WISE-TV, and CW | Local

Fort Wayne jpg

FORT WAYNE, Ind. (www.incnow.tv) – We now know what led to the temporary suspension of Inpatient Care at the Fort Wayne VA Hospital.

The Department of Veterans Affairs Office of Inspector General issued a report late last week that found the facility did not effectively and consistently fill upper and mid-level leadership positions, there were lapses in clinical judgment by individual providers, and there was limited compliance in maintaining nurse competencies.

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Managers that were in place often did not provide necessary leadership.

The office selected three patient cases and found that monitoring of vital signs were not being followed resulting in the patient being transferred to non-VA facilities.

The Fort Wayne facility is slowly restoring services as problems are addressed in the report.

The report was commissioned by Senator Joe Donnelly and 3rd District Congressman Marlin Stutzman.

via VA Hospital Releases Report On Temporary “Pause” (VIDEO) | Indiana’s NewsCenter: News, Sports, Weather, Fort Wayne WPTA-TV, WISE-TV, and CW | Local.

Lawmakers call Fort Wayne, Ind, VA Hospital report findings unacceptable

Lawmakers call Fort Wayne Ind, VA Hospital report findings unacceptable.

Lawmakers call VA Hospital report findings unacceptable

Updated: Sunday, 04 Aug 2013, 8:37 PM EDT

Published : Sunday, 04 Aug 2013, 8:37 PM EDT

FORT WAYNE, Ind. (WANE) – The Department of Veterans Affairs Office of Inspector General released a report last week which took a close look at services that caused a suspension at Fort Wayne’s VA hospital.

Senator Joe Donnelly and Congressman Marlin Stutzman asked for an inspection after receiving a phone call that the hospital temporarily stopped its inpatient care last year.

” [We were] both stunned by that,” Sen. Donnelly said. “It’s not something we had been kept in the loop on.”

So, the lawmakers demanded answers.

After the results were released, both Donnelly and Stutzman said the findings were unacceptable.

“The VA’s failures, as outlined by the Inspector General’s report, are upsetting and inexcusable,” said Rep. Stutzman.

Likewise, Sen. Donnelly said, “I was outraged that some of our veterans had to be subjected to that.”

Some of the cases outlined in the report include a veteran that was deemed “ready for discharge” while still exhibiting symptoms of having a rapid heart beat. The report states “no cardiology consultation was obtained during the entirety of the hospitalization.”

In another instance, a veteran in his mid-80s with a history of heart disease had been experiencing “shortness of breath and diarrhea of months duration.” He was placed into the Intensive Care Unit after developing a fast and irregular heartbeat. After 24 hours of appearing more alert, he was taken out of ICU. Two days later the veteran died.

The Inspector General’s Office looked over all medical records and nursing documents. It reviewed the quality of care as well as management.

The report showed the hospital didn’t effectively fill upper and mid-level leadership positions which in turn played a role in the hospital’s budget deficits. It was also discovered that the people in those leadership positions were not adequately fulfilling their duties.

The office also questioned some of the clinical judgments made, and it recommended the hospital consider how many services it can reliably provide.

Sen. Donnelly said a new management team has been set in place and that him and Congressman Stutzman won’t accept “nothing less than the very best.”

Senator Donnelly and Representative Stutzman said they will continue working to ensure the hospital makes all of the recommended changes.

Isakson on VA investigation: “We’re going to hold them accountable”| www.wsbtv.com

Sen. Isakson heads to Atlanta to hold the VA accountable for malpractice leading to the deaths of veterans at the Atlanta VA.More information about this and other medical malpractice at veterans affairs hospitals and lawyers who handle medical malpractice cases against the VA for veterans at VAmalpractice.info

Sen. Isakson heads to Atlanta to hold the VA accountable for malpractice leading to the deaths of veterans at the Atlanta VA.

 

Isakson on VA investigation: “We’re going to hold them… | www.wsbtv.com.

ATLANTA — Channel 2 Action News has confirmed the Department of Veterans Affairs’ top health care executive will testify at a U.S. Senate hearing in Atlanta.

The hearing was sparked by a Channel 2 Action News investigation into a series of patient deaths and other problems at the Atlanta VA Medical Center.

Channel 2 investigative reporter Aaron Diamant has learned that hearing will happen Aug. 7 at the Georgia State University Student Center.

Sen. Johnny Isakson, R-Georgia, will chair it. He told Diamant on Friday the public is invited to see top VA leaders on the hot seat. He promised they will not be let off the hook.

Isakson didn’t mince words about his expectations for the rare Senate Veterans Affairs Committee field hearing.

“There is no wiggle room. There is no margin of error. We got to have the facts and nothing but the facts,” Isakson said.

A Channel 2 Action News investigation last April exposed federal reports that blamed mismanagement by Atlanta VA Medical Center leaders for patient deaths, including two suicides, plus security problems, bad patient monitoring and poor oversight of outpatient programs.

As recently as two weeks ago, new hospital director Leslie Wiggins remained emphatic, saying, “I cannot say that I think anyone should be fired.”

So far, only two nameless hospital staffers got a letter of reprimand. Isakson is reserving judgment on firings for now.

“We’re also not out to get a scalp just to say ‘look what we did,'” Isakson said.

On tap to testify are VA Undersecretary for Health Robert Petzel and director Wiggins, plus a long list of Georgia military and medical leaders.

 

Las Vegas VA physician charged by Nevada Board of Medical Examiners for not supervising her private practice

Las Vegas VA's website shows that Darby Clayson is still on staff a week after the Neveda Board of Medical Examiners filed formal charges against her for failing to supervise her private practice.More information about this and other medical malpractice at veterans affairs hospitals and lawyers who handle medical malpractice cases against the VA for veterans at VAmalpractice.info

Las Vegas VA’s website shows that Darby Clayson is still on staff a week after the Neveda Board of Medical Examiners filed formal charges against her for failing to supervise her private practice.

Las Vegas, NV (KTNV) — The state has filed charges against a local doctor following a Contact 13 investigation.

As Darcy Spears explains, the doctor is under fire for allowing her assistant to run her medical practice.

What you don’t see at Modern Medical has the state very concerned.

The doctor, they say, is not in.

Dr. Darby Clayson’s name is on the door. She’s listed as the supervising physician. In fact, the only actual doctor on Modern Medical’s staff.

But the state has charged her with failing to do the very job that her title describes.

And it’s an issue Contact 13 first exposed nearly a year and a half ago.

“People come there expecting that there’s a doctor supervising this particular place, and the doctor was nowhere to be found,” said Attorney Easton Harris in February 2012.

Harris represents a group of former Modern Medical employees who are involved in lawsuits with Angie Lorenzo, the physician’s assistant who owns and operates Modern Medical.

She’s not a doctor, but is allowed to practice under a doctor’s supervision.

The state’s six-count complaint against Dr. Clayson includes charges of failure to supervise, malpractice, disrepute and records violations.

“She came in and got Angie once a month and they went to lunch and that was it,” says Lisa Clarke, who worked as a certified medical assistant at Modern Medical for most

“She came in and got Angie once a month and they went to lunch and that was it,” says Lisa Clarke, who worked as a certified medical assistant at Modern Medical for most of 2011.

Clarke’s lawsuit against Lorenzo says Dr. Clayson’s only role was collecting paychecks. In exchange, she allowed Modern Medical to operate under her license.

Lisa: I never saw her in the practice doing any kind of doctor work
Darcy: What interaction with patients did she have?
Lisa: She had absolutely none.

Lorenzo is already facing state charges, which are still pending before the board.

They say her actions should have raised red flags for Dr. Clayson.

We spoke to Lorenzo in July, when she told us, “I’ve always done my best to be a stellar physician’s assistant, to provide the highest quality care and to document appropriately.”

The state says Lorenzo provided improper patient care, including unnecessary medical testing, injections and procedures.

She’s also accused of compromising a patient’s safety by prescribing excessive thyroid hormone.

Certified professional coder Beth Petschauer reviewed more than 300 patient records while contracted with Modern Medical.

“She (Lorenzo) would say the patient is vitamin D deficient, and I would say where’s the lab documentation to support that?  And her comment was, well, everybody’s vitamin D deficient.”

The state also says Lorenzo did multiple tests and procedures that were inappropriate for the listed diagnosis, care or treatment.

They found an absence of medical decision making in the records, which they call very hard to follow, even contradictory.

“She would say that the patient denied having malaise and fatigue and then use the diagnosis code for malaise and fatigue,” says Petschauer.

Perhaps most alarming? The state says on multiple occasions, Lorenzo used and dispensed expired medication on patients.

“She put them on discount and charged the patients half of what they normally would have cost and she sold them expired medications and had them injected into the patients,” Clarke says.

State law says as the supervising physician, Dr. Clayson is responsible for Lorenzo’s actions and any violations of the medical practice act.

Lorenzo sent Contact 13 a statement saying, “Dr. Clayson has supervised me within the scope of the law, and continues to be a qualified and caring supervising physician.  She has followed the law to the highest extent.”

We spoke to her about Clayson in July.

Darcy: No one who we’ve spoken to has ever seen the doctor whose name is on their bills.  Why is that?
Angie: Um, I don’t know.  I mean, Dr. Clayson works here.  She’s available at the patient’s discretion.

Dr. Clayson wouldn’t go on camera or answer any of our questions.

She sent us a written statement which says in part “In the last four years, I have reviewed her charts, visited the clinic on a regular basis, held regular medical discussions and been available for consultation during clinic hours… I strongly disagree with the charges several patients, employees and the medical board have brought against Ms. Lorenzo and myself.  Our only aim has always been to provide compassionate, humanistic, state of the art medical care.”

Dr. Clayson works for the VA Southern Nevada Health System. She’s

currently on staff at the Veterans’ Hospital in North Las Vegas.

State records show in April, she reported a $275,000 settlement from a 2006 case where her “negligence in diagnosis, care and treatment resulted in a patient’s death.”

The board found her guilty of malpractice in that case back in 2011, but all they did was issue a public reprimand and order her to pay investigation costs.

Lisa Clarke hopes something more significant happens in this case.

“I’m glad the board is finally taking action and paying attention because ultimately, the people that are suffering are the patients.  And somebody’s got to stop it.”

Dr. Clayson now has a chance to answer the charges and request a hearing.  Her response is due to the state board in about two weeks.
Here is the full statement from Angie Lorenzo:

“Dr. Clayson has supervised me within the scope of the law, and continues to be a qualified and caring supervising physician.  She has followed the law to the highest extent.  She is well educated and is one of the smartest physicians that I know and have worked with.  These allegations are not new.  They are the same that have surfaced for years due to 2 sets of people: 1. Those that are disgruntled employees, and 2. patients that owe money for medical services rendered.

The issues will continue as long as patients retaliate and extort their medical providers by complaining to regulatory agencies for their gain.  The company has to be paid for services rendered. The lies and the accusations must cease!

We are working mothers practicing medicine and do our best, the standard of care is always first and foremost.  Patients have success, and no patients have ever had a bad outcome.  We deny all allegations.  We are confident in a positive resolution.”

Here is the full statement from Dr. Darby Clayson:

“Throughout my training at MIT, Baylor College of Medicine and countless continuing medical education (CME) courses, 20 years of duty in the Air Force, and almost ten years of service for the VA, I have tried to uphold the highest medical standards at all times, while maintaining a caring, humanistic approach that often is so lacking in our medical system.

4 years ago Ms Lorenzo approached me with her idea to start a clinic that was patient focused, inviting and treats the whole patient, not just lab values and disease states. I agreed to supervise her by regularly reviewing her charts and discussing patient care matters. She already had a history of many years of practice without issues and I knew her to be an intelligent, honest medical practitioner. In the last four years, I have reviewed her charts, visited the clinic on a regular basis, held regular medical discussions and been available for consultation during clinic hours.

I strongly disagree with the charges several patients, employees and the medical board have brought against Ms. Lorenzo and myself, and I repeat, our only aim has always been to provide compassionate, humanistic, state of the art medical care.”

via Modern Medical doctor charged following Contact 13 investigation – www.ktnv.com.

 

A copy of the complaint filed by the Nevada Board of Medical Examiners

Clayson Complaint filed by Nevada Board of Medical Examiners